Ramen Wednesday at Rose’s Meat and Sweet


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“Passion is a term applied to a very strong feeling about a person or a thing. Passion is an intense emotion compelling, enthusiasm, or desire for anything.” What I really appreciate about taking pictures of someone performing their craft, is the ability to capture someone’s passion for what they are doing in that moment. Last week, I had a chance to watch Justin Meddis’s passion manifest itself into 60 bowls of pork laden ramen. Anyone can make a bowl of soup, add some seasoning , noodles and meat but when time and passion is added you can taste the difference.  When care is taken with the process of hours of roasting, simmering, tasting, searing, chopping and adjusting, the end result is a quaility bowl of ramen. It was joy to watch and capture the mounting tension as the first customer began to linger outside ten minutes before the 11am opening of the small butcher and bakery owned by husband and wife team Kaitie and Justin Meddis. It was the second week of what they are calling Ramen Wednesday. From 11-2, Justin shares his passion for Japanese cooking in the form of a massive bowl of what  has become a national icon of the tiny island nation Japan, Ramen.

The broth is prepared a day in advance consisting of simmered pork bones, pigs feet and covered with seaweed. Once a simmer is reached the seaweed is removed pork back fat, anchovies, mushrooms and light seasoning is added to enhance the flavor.

The broth is prepared a day in advance consisting of simmered pork bones, pigs feet and covered with seaweed. Once a simmer is reached the seaweed is removed, pork fat back, anchovies, mushrooms and light seasoning is added to enhance the flavor.

The broth is refrigerated overnight and heated again in the morning adding fish flakes, onions and other vegetables. After a short time everything is strained from the broth.

The broth is refrigerated overnight and heated again in the morning adding fish flakes, onions and other vegetables. After a short time everything is strained from the broth.

Final touches are added to the broth, miso, tare and seasoning

Final touches are added to the broth, miso, tare and seasoning

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Henry waits to add the Kakuni Braised Pork Belly to the ramen. Slices of pork belly are seared then braised in a mixture containing soy sauce, ginger, sugar and other seasoning. The pork is left in the liquid overnight to continue to soak up flavor and tenderize.

Henry waits to add the Kakuni Braised Pork Belly to the ramen. Slices of pork belly are seared then braised in a mixture containing soy sauce, ginger, sugar and other seasoning. The pork is left in the liquid overnight to continue to soak up flavor and tenderize.

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The final product, Sopporo Style Raman, soft boiled egg, kakuni pork belly, cabbage, ground pork and scallions. All ramens have a layer of oil poured over the top, Justin explained that this oil helps the broth stick to the noodles. Justin used pork fat with ginger and garlic.

Ramen Wednesday will take place again today at Rose’s Meat and Sweet Shop at 121 N Gregson Street downtown Durham from 11am-2pm. So if you are looking for something for lunch I highly recommend making the trip. There is no seating in Rose’s so you can take it with you, eat it standing in the shop or grab a piece of pavement outside.

To view more pictures taken at Rose’s Meat and Sweet click here

Roses Meat Market and Sweet Shop on Urbanspoon

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Categories: Eat Here

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2 Comments on “Ramen Wednesday at Rose’s Meat and Sweet”

  1. tom
    February 2, 2016 at 7:38 pm #

    if by tiny island you mean almost the size of California, sure, Japan is tiny.

    http://mapfight.appspot.com/jp-vs-california/japan-california-us-size-comparison

    • January 2, 2017 at 9:46 pm #

      By “tiny island nation” I meant a nation as you pointed out is the size of one of our 50 states. So by comparison I would considerate it a tiny nation by land size.

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