Trondheim Norway – Rockheim


Before my next day out in Trondheim, Norway, I stopped at Hjornet again for the Elvis Burger. The Elvis Burger was a good-sized pattie with bacon, cheese, salad, tomato, aioli and peanut butter. Served with french fries and Hjornet’s tomato sauce. I didn’t think I would like peanut butter on a burger but this sandwich definitely opened my eyes to the possibilities.

While walking the streets of Trodheim I noticed some of the man-hole covers had a small mural engraved on them. I later found out that this is the coat of arms for the City of Trondheim.

The seal is probably from the 13th century, but its earliest preserved form is on a document from 1344. The coat of arms was assumed by the city council in 1897. As such it differs very much from the very simple heraldic design of most other Norwegian coats of arms.

It features to the left a church portal with an archbishop with a bishop’s staff and a mitre, to the right a castle portal with a king with a crown holding a set of scales. The portals and figures rest on an arch beneath which are three male heads. The king and archbishop symbolises the town’s status as the first capital of Norway and as the residence of the archbishop. The set of scales are said to symbolise justice, but may also be seen as an allusion to the delicate balance between the church and the king. The three heads might symbolise the city council.

I made my way to Brattørkaia, the harbor area of the city where the ferry departs from. This is where I found Rockheim. A colossal building which houses Norway’s National Museum of Pop and Rock Music. Being completely ignorant to Norwegian Pop culture or history I initially found it hard to understand why it needed such a big building, the only Norwegian band I ever heard of was the 80’s pop group A- Ha. The museum was interesting with a lot of interactive areas. I learned a lot about Norwegian music from the 1950’s to present day hip hop artist.

After leaving Rockheim I walked down by the water and saw a local fisherman cleaning and selling fresh caught fish from his boat.

In the center of the city stands a statue of Olav Trygvason, who was the King of Norway from 995 to 1000. He founded the City of Trondheim and played a central role in spreading Christianity in Norway, often times with the use of torture of death as the medium (all things worthy of a huge statue).

Tags: , , , , ,

Categories: Travel

Subscribe

Subscribe to our RSS feed and social profiles to receive updates.

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: